The Happiest Days of Our Lives (special edition)

Written by wil

The Happiest Days of Our Lives by Wil Wheaton

Shortly after I published The Happiest Days of Our Lives
, Bill Schafer, who is the publisher and owner of Subterranean Press,
contacted me about doing a special limited edition. I discovered
Subterranean Press when they published John Scalzi's Questions for a Soldier, and I fell in love with their special editions when I got Charlie Stross' Missile Gap and Neil Gaiman's Coraline. The idea of having my little book treated the same as books by John Scalzi, Elizabeth Bear, Ray Bradbury, and Neal Stephenson
was awesome, but I wasn't sure if it was a good idea – I didn't want to
put out yet another edition of a book people already owned, and I really didn't want to do something that would devalue the 300.

I talked it over with Anne, sought advice from my friend and editor
Andrew, and I asked some friends who have worked with Bill what they
thought (it turns out that everyone who works with him adores him,
which ended up being very important to me). After a few weeks of
consideration, I realized that this was a unique opportunity, and I
would be a fool to pass it up.

I got in touch with Bill and accepted his offer. We decided that
instead of just doing a different printing of a book people already
had, I'd look through the material that just missed the final cut, and
put together a special expanded edition. I would also take all those
pictures that are on the cover, and create a special photo insert
section. (I'm really excited about this; my idea is to create something
that looks and feels like a family photo album, complete with
handwritten captions.)

Limited: $35
ISBN: 978-1-59606-244-3
Lettered: $300

Length: 200 pages (tentative)


Readers of Wil
Wheaton’s website know that he is a masterful teller of elegant stories
about his life. Building on the critical success of Dancing Barefoot and Just A Geek, he has collected more of his own favorite stories in his third book, The Happiest Days of Our Lives.
These are the stories Wil loves to tell, because they are the closest
to his heart: stories about being a huge geek, passing his geeky
hobbies and values along to his own children, and vividly painting what
it meant to grow up in the ’70s and come of age in the ’80s as part of
the video game/D&D/BBS/Star Wars figures generation.

Within the pages of The Happiest Days of Our Lives, you will find:

  • “The Butterfly Tree”: how one Back to School night continues to shape Wil’s sense of social justice, thirty years later;
  • “Blue Light Special”: the greatest challenge a ten year-old could face in 1982: save his allowance, or buy Star Wars figures?
  • “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Geek”: why fantasy
    role-playing games are such an important part of Wil’s past – and his
    present
  • “The Big Goodbye”: a visit to Paramount gives Wheaton a second chance to say farewell to Star Trek . . . properly, this time
  • “Let Go”: a moving eulogy for a beloved friend

In all of these tales,
Wheaton brings the reader into the raw heart of the story, holding
nothing back, and you are invited to join him on a journey through The Happiest Days of Our Lives.

“Wil Wheaton’s made a new
career out of doing well that which is in fact the hardest thing to do
at all: he writes, brilliantly and simply and gloriously, about joy.”
–Warren Ellis, author of Crooked Little Vein, Transmetropolitan, and Planetary

The Subterranean Press edition of The Happiest Days of Our Lives will be expanded from the version Wil released himself, to include additional essays, and a photo section.

Limited: 2000 signed hardcover copies
Lettered: 26 signed leatherbound copies, housed in a custom traycase

Just A Geek (audio)

Written by wil

Just_a_Geek_coverHey, if you’ve enjoyed my Radio Free Burrito podcasts, I think you may like the audio version of Just A Geek:

This journey is a fascinating read, made even more intimate and
fulfilling by Wil’s narrative. This is not just an audio book, it’s a
glimpse into the psyche of the man who considers himself…
Just a Geek. NOTE: Due to graphic language, some content may be unsuitable for
younger audiences.

A few RFB listeners have commented to me that they
picked up the audio book after listening to the podcast, so I thought
I’d make it nice and easy for anyone who is interested in checking it
out. It’s available as an instantly-downloadable, DRM-free MP3 for just $20.

I’m very proud of the audio book. I’ve talked in the past about what a huge letdown my experience wih O’Reilly was on the print version of
the book, and much of the joy I’d hoped to feel with its release has instead come from the recording of the audio version, which ended up
being a performance, with asides, commentary, and reflections on the material that aren’t in the print version of the book. I guess it’s
like I’m reading the book to you, and occasionally setting it down to give some meta-commentary on various passages.

So if you liked the print book, my PAX keynote, my performance of The Trade, or if you like the podcasts, I’m pretty sure you’ll dig the audiobook.

Here’s all the nifty stuff they put at Amazon about the print version:

Review
“A cleverly constructed and vivid collection of
memoirs with flashes of brilliant wit, this title betters even Dancing
Barefoot.” – Paul Hudson, Linux Format, Nov (top stuff award)

Product Description
Wil Wheaton has never been one to take the conventional path to success. Despite early stardom through his childhood role in the motion picture “Stand By Me”,
and growing up on television as Wesley Crusher on “Star Trek: The Next Generation”, Wil left Hollywood in pursuit of happiness, purpose, and a
viable means of paying the bills. In the oddest of places, Topeka, Kansas, Wil discovered that despite his claims to fame, he was at heart Just a Geek.

In this, his newest book, Wil shares his deeply personal and difficult journey to find himself. You’ll understand the rigors, and joys, of Wil’s rediscovering of himself, as he comes to terms with what it means
to be famous, or, ironically, famous for once having been famous. Writing with honesty and disarming humanity, Wil touches on the frustrations associated with his acting career, his inability to distance himself from Ensign Crusher in the public’s eyes, the launch of his incredibly successful web site, wilwheaton.net, and the joy he’s found in writing. Through all of this, Wil shares the ups and downs he encountered along the journey, along with the support and love he discovered from his friends and family.

The stories in Just a Geek include:

– Wil’s plunge from teen star to struggling actor
– Discovering the joys of HTML, blogging, Linux, and web design
– The struggle between Wesley Crusher, Starfleet ensign, and Wil Wheaton, author and blogger
– Gut-wrenching reactions to the 9-11 disaster
– Moving tales of Wil’s relationships with his wife, step-children, and extended family
– The transition from a B-list actor to an A-list author

Wil Wheaton–celebrity, blogger, and geek–writes for the geek in all of us. Engaging, witty, and pleasantly self-deprecating, Just a Geek will surprise you and make you laugh.

Just A Geek

Written by wil

Just A Geek by Wil Wheaton

Review

"A cleverly constructed and vivid collection of
memoirs with flashes of brilliant wit, this title betters even Dancing
Barefoot." – Paul Hudson, Linux Format, Nov (top stuff award)

Product Description
Wil Wheaton has never
been one to take the conventional path to success. Despite early
stardom through his childhood role in the motion picture "Stand By Me",
and growing up on television as Wesley Crusher on "Star Trek: The Next
Generation", Wil left Hollywood in pursuit of happiness, purpose, and a
viable means of paying the bills. In the oddest of places, Topeka,
Kansas, Wil discovered that despite his claims to fame, he was at heart
Just a Geek.

In
this, his newest book, Wil shares his deeply personal and difficult
journey to find himself. You'll understand the rigors, and joys, of
Wil's rediscovering of himself, as he comes to terms with what it means
to be famous, or, ironically, famous for once having been famous.
Writing with honesty and disarming humanity, Wil touches on the
frustrations associated with his acting career, his inability to
distance himself from Ensign Crusher in the public's eyes, the launch
of his incredibly successful web site, wilwheaton.net, and the joy he's
found in writing. Through all of this, Wil shares the ups and downs he
encountered along the journey, along with the support and love he
discovered from his friends and family.

The stories in Just a Geek include:

– Wil's plunge from teen star to struggling actor
– Discovering the joys of HTML, blogging, Linux, and web design
– The struggle between Wesley Crusher, Starfleet ensign, and Wil Wheaton, author and blogger
– Gut-wrenching reactions to the 9-11 disaster
– Moving tales of Wil's relationships with his wife, step-children, and extended family
– The transition from a B-list actor to an A-list author

Wil
Wheaton–celebrity, blogger, and geek–writes for the geek in all of
us. Engaging, witty, and pleasantly self-deprecating, Just a Geek will
surprise you and make you laugh.

Star Trek: The Manga Volume 3: Uchu

Written by wil

The art of war by wil wheaton illustrated by ej su

My story The Art of War in the latest Star Trek manga got a really nice mention at Trek Movie dot Com:

Fans of Wil Wheaton’s blog or books know him to be an adroit writer
of nonfiction, an almost Mark Twain for the geek crowd if you don’t
mind such a comparison. Yet his "Art of War" story shows he is talented
with fictional narratives, too. The story involves Kirk and a Klingon
named Kring both trapped together in a collapsed mine on the planet
Angrena. The "enemies forced to cooperate" situation isn’t unique to
science fiction or to Star Trek, be it the film Enemy Mine or
"The Enemy" and "Darmok" episodes of TNG. These kinds of narratives
succeed if there is something different about how they are told and if
they provide the reader with something to think about with the
characters or a social lesson. Wheaton does all of these things with
his comic.

The story begins with both Kirk and Kring having to answer for their
behaviors of helping the other person survive. One side of the page
tell the story from Kirk’s experience, the other side of the page is
from Kring’s. This allows for a juxtaposition of the Federation and
Klingon cultures throughout the narrative. Also, we learn something
about Captain Kirk and his decisions here show why he is such a great
leader. There is also a social lesson here about not treating people,
especially the enemy during war, as stereotypes. It is a lesson which
is in the grand tradition of Star Trek.

The art by E.J. Su is effective, although one of my complaints about
manga comics and Star Trek has historically been the lack of colors.
The tradition for manga is of course black and white art, yet Star
Trek’s tradition is bright colors. In fact, colors are an important
storytelling device in Star Trek, from adding danger to scenes with red
shirts to reinforcing the symbolism of diversity. I am not suggesting
that a manga should have colors, it is that the lack of colors for a
Star Trek comic are disconcerting and obviously distracting. That being
said, Su’s art is quintessential manga art, with sharp lines that show
the expressions of the characters in exaggerated and fun styles.

They gave me 10 out of 10! Dude!

Buy Star Trek The Manga Volume 3 at Amazon.

Star Trek: The Manga Volume 2: Kakan ni Shinkou

Written by wil

Star trek the manga volume 2
Like that television classic, these new journeys venture into the
terrain of social politics, personal reflection…and bare-knuckled
brawls between the dashing Captain Kirk and the galaxy’s most cunning
alien species. Vulcan science officer Spock's unflappable logic, Doctor
“Bones” McCoy’s flare for drama, chief engineer Scott's perpetual
struggle to keep the warp engines online, and the never before told
origin story of one of the Star Trek universe’s most popular
adversaries, all come at you in a fresh, new style.

TrekMovie had some very nice things to say about my story in Star Trek: The Manga volume 2:

Wil Wheaton skipped the easy Wesley Crusher story (are there any other kind?) to pen a TOS tale for Tokyopop’s second Star Trek: The Manga collection that debuted last year, and it’s easily one of the best in the book. Drawn by E.J. Su, recently of IDW’s Transformers comics —official non-Trek plug accomplished!— Wheaton’s “Cura Te Ipsum” (Latin for “heal thyself”) tackles a Kirk vs.
the Prime Directive tale with surprising skill, and establishes his
cred as a comics creator well beyond his celebrated cult of geek.

Buy Star Trek: The Manga Volume 2 at Amazon.

Dancing Barefoot

Written by wil

Dancing barefoot by wil wheaton
Review

"Short but sweet, a highly recommended addtition to
anyone's bookshelf – Trekker, Trekkie, geek or otherwise – we can't
wait for his next book!" – Paul Hudson, Linux Format, July – Linux
Format Top Stuff Award

Product Description
Wil Wheaton–blogger,
geek, and Star Trek: The Next Generation's Wesley Crusher–gives us
five short-but-true tales of life in the so-called Space Age in Dancing
Barefoot. With a true geek's unflinching honesty, Wil examines life,
love, the web, and the absurdities of Hollywood in these compelling
autobiographical narratives. chronicle a teen TV star's journey to
maturity and self-acceptance. Far from the usual celebrity tell-all,
Dancing Barefoot is a vivid account of one man's version of that
universal story, the search for self. If you've ever fallen in love,
wondered what goes on behind the scenes at a Star Trek convention, or
thought hard about the meaning of life, you'll find a kindred soul in
the pages of Dancing Barefoot. In the process of uncovering his true
geeky self, Wil Wheaton speaks to the inner geek in all of us.

The stories:

Houses in Motion – Memories fill the emptiness left within a childhood home, and saying goodbye brings them to life.

Ready
Or Not Here I Come – A game of hide-n-seek with the kids works as a
time machine, taking Wil on a tour of the hiding and seeking of years
gone by.

Inferno – Two 15-year-olds pass in the night leaving
behind pleasant memories and a perfumed Car Wars Deluxe Edition Box
Set.

We Close Our Eyes – A few beautiful moments spent dancing in the rain.

The Saga of SpongeBob VegasPants – A story of love, hate, laughter and the acceptance of all things Trek.

Buy Dancing Barefoot at Amazon.